“Of Course He Should Be Impeached”

By David Catron

Last week, Jeffrey Lord asked the following question in the American Spectator: “Should Obama be impeached?” I have enormous respect for Lord, and agree with virtually everything he writes, but his column reflects an unsettling trend in the way many view this issue. Most pundits and politicians discuss Obama’s serial violations of the Constitution as if mulling an interesting academic subject. They ponder such arcana as the definition of “high crimes and misdemeanors,”
the number of Senate votes required to convict an impeached President, the effect of the process on the GOP’s electoral prospects in 2016, ad infinitum. Few, however, discuss impeachment as a serious possibility or even a rational course of action.

In a less complacent nation, Lord’s question would not be rhetorical. It is the duty of the House of Representatives to impeach Obama. Every member of Congress takes an oath to defend the Constitution and the President has declared war on that foundational document. Barack Obama is systematically destroying the checks and balances the framers put in place to limit the power of the office he holds. The powers of the Presidency, as the founders conceived them, were meant to
be constrained by two coequal branches of the government — the national legislature and the judiciary. President Obama routinely flouts inconvenient laws passed by the former and publicly excoriates the latter when its rulings displease him.

Much of what this man has done since taking office is clearly illegal, and he is becoming more and more brazen about it every day. His most recent crime against the Constitution was, of course, his latest unilateral revision of the deadline by which businesses must conform to Obamacare’s employer mandate. This mandate, according to the stipulations of the health care “reform” law, should have taken effect January 1. However, that date proved politically inconvenient for
the Democrats, so Obama ordered his minions to change the deadline — twice — despite lacking any legal authority to do so. What has been done by the people invested with the power to put a stop to such illegal decrees? Virtually nothing. Why not? In the words of Senator Ted Cruz, “There aren’t enough votes in the Senate.” I admire Senator Cruz, but he is evidently confused. It is true that, to remove a President from office, a two-thirds majority of the Senate must vote to convict him of charges emanating from the House impeachment process. However, impeachment itself is a separate step — roughly analogous to an indictment in a criminal court — and requires only a simple majority in the House of Representatives. Today, the Republicans control that body by a margin of more than thirty seats. In other words, one or more articles of impeachment could be passed against Obama in the House of Representatives without a single Democrat vote.

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